Search for Founding President & CEO

Would you like to lead and advance an innovative organization? Growing Inland Achievement is hiring a founding President & CEO. If you are interested, check out the Position Description. For questions, contact the search firm Morris & Berger at 818.507.1234 or  mb@morrisberger.com.

GROWING INLAND ACHIEVEMENT INVITES APPLICATIONS FOR THE 2018 INNOVATION AWARD

(Rancho Cucamonga, CA) – Growing Inland Achievement (GIA) is pleased to announce the opening of the 2018 Innovation Awards to support local organizations committed to increasing baccalaureate degree attainment and economic success throughout the Inland Empire Region of Southern California, which includes San Bernardino and Riverside Counties.

Innovation Award Funding provides up to $150,000 over two years, while encouraging the contribution of local resources through a 50% matching requirement to promote sustainability and organizational capacity. It is the intention of the Innovation Award to advance promising efforts in the region that correlate to bachelor’s degree completion, while also recognizing the value of garnering additional resources that can be utilized for sustainability over the longer term.

Applicants may be a K-12 school district, community college or community college district, four-year university, nonprofit organization, or any combination of such institutions in Riverside and/or San Bernardino counties. Deadline to apply is February 16, 2018. Funding decisions will be announced in March. The recipients will be honored at the Governing Board meeting on April 9, 2018. Requirements for the awards can be found on our website.

Growing Inland Achievement is a bi-county, K-20 collaborative comprised of top leaders of K-12 education, higher education, business, and civic sectors who are committed to working together in new and innovative ways and aligning resources to achieve the following goals for the region:

  • Align educational policy initiatives regionally via cradle-to-career collective impact model.
  • Increase college preparedness, particularly in math, resulting in a 20% reduction in the number of students requiring remediation at matriculation from high school to college within five years.
  • Increase baccalaureate, associate, certificate, and credential attainment by 15% across the two counties within five years.
  • Increase the six year graduation rate by 10% over five years.
  • Improve career preparedness through strengthened partnership with industry to better align education with workforce development needs.

The GIA Governing Board is comprised of top education and business leaders including San Bernardino County Superintendent Ted Alejandre, Inland Empire Economic Partnership President/CEO Paul Granillo, Riverside Community College District Chancellor Wolde-Ab Isaac, Cal State San Bernardino President Tomás Morales, Chaffey College Superintendent/President Henry Shannon, OneFuture Coachella Valley President/CEO Sheila Thornton, UC Riverside Chancellor Kim Wilcox, and Riverside County Superintendent Judy White.

 

Should you have questions about the selection process, you may contact Ann Marie Allen, Senior Director info@inlandempiregia.org, (909) 256-0011.

All Things Transfer

Two new reports on the status of transfer in California highlight the opportunities for improvement within the system and recommend changes that could make a positive impact on students in the Inland Empire.

The Transfer Maze: The High Cost to Students and the State of California published by the Campaign for College Opportunity highlights the critical role transfer plays in producing college graduates and providing economic opportunity, and the unnecessary barriers that impede transfer for far too many Californians, resulting in high costs to students and the state. Although the majority of California community college students enroll wanting to transfer, students transferred at an average rate of only 4% after two years of enrollment, 25% after four years of enrollment, and 38% after six years of enrollment. For the state, these low transfer rates yield high costs associated with a minimum number of seats available to new students and lost tax revenue from people with delayed entry into the workforce or whose economic prospects are reduced as a result of an unfinished degree. For the student starting at a community college, she or he may pay $36,000-$38,000 more to obtain a bachelor’s degree than would a student enrolling directly at a four-year college.

Through the Gate: Mapping the Transfer Landscape for California Community College Students  from the RP Group and sponsored by College Futures Foundation investigated why many students in California enter higher education through the state’s community college system with the intent to transfer to a four-year college or university, and yet the transfer rate from the California Community College (CCC) system is stubbornly low—fewer than 30% of CCC students enrolled between 2010 and 2015 who intended to transfer did so within six years.

The report’s findings point to a number of challenges, including:

  • 300,000 students got stuck at or near the transfer gate, and more than half of those students left the community college system without a credential.
  • Math is a barrier—92% of students near the transfer gate had not completed transfer-level math.
  • Latino men and Native American women are the least likely to transfer.
  • Region plays a role—students in the Inland Empire are the least likely to make it through the transfer gate.

The Majority Report

The Majority Report: Supporting the Educational Success of Latino Students in California” provides an extensive look at how the state’s largest ethnic group is faring at every level of California’s education system. The report finds that while the over 3 million Latino students in K-12 schools are the majority of California’s 6.2 million K-12 population, and nearly 1 million Latino students are in California’s public colleges and universities, these students continue to face troubling inequities from early learning through higher education. California’s Latino students:

  • Attend the nation’s most segregated schools;
  • Are often tracked away from college-preparatory coursework;
  • Are sometimes perceived as less academically capable than their White or Asian peers; and
  • Have insufficient access to early childhood education;
  • Are less likely to feel connected to their school environment;
  • Are more likely to be required to take remedial courses at colleges and universities.

The study also highlights bright spots throughout the state where promising practices are helping Latino students advance academically, dispelling the myth that these gaps cannot be closed, and reiterating the need for more action and urgency from state leaders. Several programs in the Inland Empire were highlighted including:

Reduce barriers to family engagement with schools Across Val Verde Unified, every traditional high school hosts a family resource center. The district also provides a bilingual family engagement center that provides everything from assistance with financial aid forms  to courses on health, parenting, computer literacy, and ESL for parents. Last year, over 7,000 parents participated in events through the district family engagement center.

Support counselors Riverside County Office of Education created the Riverside County Education Collaborative to pilot college-going interventions with five focus districts and three higher education partners, and then scaled what works county-wide. One initiative, the School Counselor Leadership Network, brings together high school counselors to collaborate and share best practices.

Expand dual enrollment At Rancho Cucamonga High School in San Bernardino County, about 150 students enrolled in Chaffey College through dual enrollment. One of the school’s counselors brought the application, orientation, and assessment process in-house. Two community college classes are now offered on the high school campus during the year, and an additional course offered in summer.

Article courtesy of the Education Trust-West.

UC President Napolitano Encourages Local Students to go to College

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Courtesy of The Press Enterprise –

University of California President Janet Napolitano visited  Valley View High School in Moreno Valley on Thursday, Nov. 9, to assure students that a UC education is attainable.

She touted the University of California’s Blue and Gold Opportunity Plan that waives tuition or university fees for students whose families make $80,000 or less a year.

She said the UC system takes a holistic approach in accepting students by taking into account extra-curricular activities and considering specific challenges they encounter — not just their grades.

The University of California is especially welcoming to first-generation students, she said. This fall, an estimated 45 percent of freshmen were the first in their families to attend a four-year university, according to an August report.

“When you get to the University of California, and you will get there, you will be in a community,” Napolitano said. “It’s a community of students. It’s a community of scholars.”

 

Education is key to Inland Empire prosperity

Education is one of the keys to sustained, long-term economic progress and prosperity in the Inland Empire. […] A June report from the Public Policy Institute of California noted that growing the number of college graduates in the Inland Empire will be essential for statewide economic well-being. Arguing that current college graduation rates are insufficient to provide the number of educated workers needed by 2030, researchers noted that while the Inland Empire awards 14 percent of high school diplomas in the state, it only produces 6 percent of the state’s bachelor’s degrees.

Not enough Inland graduates are going to college, for a variety of reasons. One problem is that high school graduates in the region are less likely to have completed and passed the A-G required courses which make them eligible for admission to Cal State universities or the University of California system. In 2016, only 44.3 percent of graduates in Riverside County and 37.6 in San Bernardino County graduated eligible for CSU/UC admission.

But even many who do graduate eligible for admission to state colleges simply aren’t applying or going to college, or they drop out at some point along the way. Ann Marie Allen, senior director of the Growing Inland Achievement initiative, is studying why that is in an effort to improve outcomes in the region. While research is ongoing, Allen argues the region has to undergo a cultural shift to encourage more students to go to college.

“Many of our families don’t believe college is available and affordable,” she said, noting the relatively low cost of local colleges. To improve this, Allen stresses the importance of getting the business community involved in partnerships, like the Riverside County Education Collaborative, that work to increase college attendance.

Content from a Press-Enterprise Opinion written by Sal Rodriguez and Brian Calle published September 22, 2017

2017 GIA Innovation Awards Ceremony Is Major Success

On October 18, 2017, Growing Inland Achievement was pleased to honor the recipients for the 2017 Growing Inland Achievement Innovation Awards. Of the many applicants, three outstanding proposals were chosen to receive $150,000 to implement innovative programs to achieve degree attainment and economic success throughout the region.

Riverside County Office of Education/College and Career Readiness (CCR) Unit (http://www.rcoe.us/)

The Riverside County Office of Education (RCOE) has a long history of working collaboratively and supporting 23 districts through network activities. Through continuing this work, and with the development of the Riverside County Education Collaborative (RCEC), RCOE is uniquely positioned to build districts’ capacity to lead change at a local level, build awareness of pressing challenges, identify solutions, and to scale up innovative and effective practices to dramatically impact student achievement across our region and state.

As the lead entity, RCOE has made a strong commitment to this work by creating a College and Career Readiness (CCR) unit which consists of an Executive Director, a Director, and a Coordinator of counseling services. Additional support comes from eight Temporary Management Specialists who are experts at their site in addressing and improving state and national college and career indicators. This level of staffing confirms the commitment RCOE has to ensure all students are college and career ready as well as improve postsecondary enrollment and persistence in Riverside County.

The $150,000 award from GIA will be used over the course of two years to help build the capacity of the districts and expand the college and career readiness activities in the Riverside region.  This also aligns with GIA’s goals to increase college preparedness, particularly in math, as well as increase baccalaureate, associate, certificate, and credential attainment by 15% across San Bernardino and Riverside counties within five years.

“This innovation award will allow us to study the phenomena that has been elusive to us in K12 education, which is making a connection with our students to higher education. Being able to partner with the community colleges and universities in the region will give us the ability to study how our young men and women can transition from a K12 environment to a post-secondary environment and thrive, survive, and get complete. This award will allow us to better understand this phenomena in a much deeper and more successful way.”–Gil Compton, Riverside County Office of Education.

Chaffey College/The Regional InTech Learning Center (http://intechcenter.org/)

Chaffey College’s InTech Center is currently the largest and most responsive training center in the region where students can obtain the skills they need in today’s workforce environment.

The $150,000 award from Growing Inland Achievement will support the development of a model Conventional Machinist Training (CMT) program that is scalable, sustainable, and replicable.  This program will provide students with the fundamentals of machining and machine repair.  Upon program completion, students will have the needed skills set to find entry-mid level employment as an operator of a lathe, mill, grinder, drill press, etc. in the machining and tooling industry.

This aligns with GIA’s goal to improve career preparedness through a strengthened partnership with industry to better align education with workforce development needs.

“Chaffey College and the InTech Center is so excited about this award from Growing Inland Achievement because it will allow us to expand the successful programs that we are already delivering at the InTech Center and serve a broader audience of both students and employers. The Conventional Machinist Training Program will provide stackable, industry-recognized credentials to students in a lucrative career field in the machining and tooling industry of manufacturing. What makes our approach innovative is the focus we will place on recruiting women into this training program. Women who have already enrolled in some of our other non-traditional programs have gone on to do very well in their careers, and manufacturing employers are asking for more female applicants for their open positions. Additionally, this program will allow us to serve small- to medium-sized manufacturers who still use older, more traditional machines because they cannot afford newer technologies, or the nature of the product that they manufacture lends itself to the use of traditional machinery. After program graduation, students will enter their career field at a mid-level position with room for growth; as they promote within their companies, they can then come back to InTech to obtain more certifications, or they can enroll in credit programs at Chaffey College which will lead to either an associate’s or transfer to a bachelor’s program. Many individuals who enter employment in technical fields continue on in their post-secondary education to qualify for management positions and move up within their companies.” –Sandra Sisco, Director of Economic Development, Chaffey College.

California State University, San Bernardino/Quant Lab (https://www.csusb.edu/)

Need for remediation in math and English at the college-level is a costly and widespread problem in the United States. It has been estimated that nationally the cost of remedial education is over 1 billion dollars per year (Saxton & Boylan, 2001). This is a particular problem within California public colleges and universities. Students who require remediation at matriculation are far less likely to earn their degree. If they do remain enrolled, those students on average take longer to complete their degree than those without the need for remediation.

The Department of Mathematics and the Office of Undergraduate Studies at CSUSB was awarded $150,000 to develop and test a lab course, Quant Lab, that will provide co-requisite support to students needing remediation to succeed in General Education math courses. The new course will be piloted during the 2017-2018 academic year (AY) and within the Summer 2018 Coyote First STEP (CFS) summer program for underprepared first-year students.

This aligns with two GIA’s goals: (1) Increase college preparedness, particularly in math, resulting in 20% reduction in number of students requiring remediation at matriculation from high school to college within 5 years; and (2) to increase baccalaureate, associate, certificate, and credential attainment by 15% across San Bernardino and Riverside counties within five years.

“One of the challenges that we have is we accept students into college assuming they are college ready, and yet we put them through what we consider developmental coursework that is remedial and don’t lead to a degree. This is taking the most vulnerable students and add additional time, units, and costs. This model needs to flip and view it as an opportunity by being creative in the kinds of opportunities we provide these students, and math is one of those areas of opportunity. Math is a critical lynchpin for student success and degree attainment, but our approach to math instruction hasn’t changed since 1965. With the GIA Innovation Award we are moving away from a one size fits all approach into a curriculum full of options that are relevant, interesting, and important with a focus on job skills and functional applications of technology.” Craig Seal, Dean of Undergraduate Studies and Susan Addington, professor of mathematics, California State University San Bernardino.

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For more information on these awards, as well as future funding opportunities, please contact us directly at (909) 256-0011 or info@inlandempiregia.org.

2017 Innovation Awards Announced!

For Immediate Release

October 12, 2017

Ann Marie Allen, Senior Director

info@inlandempiregia.org

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Growing Inland Achievement Announces Innovation Awards

October 12, 2017 (Rancho Cucamonga, CA) – The 2017 Growing Inland Achievement (GIA) Innovation Awards were announced today. These financial awards will go to organizations committed to making substantial progress in achieving one or more of the GIA educational goals designed to increase degree attainment and economic success throughout the Inland Empire Region of Southern California, which includes San Bernardino and Riverside Counties.

Growing Inland Achievement is a bi-county, K-20 collaborative comprised of top leaders of K-12 education, higher education, business, and civic sectors who are committed to working together in new ways and aligning resources to achieve the following goals for the region:

  • Align educational policy initiatives regionally via cradle-to-career collective impact model.
  • Increase college preparedness, particularly in math, resulting in a 20% reduction in the number of students requiring remediation at matriculation from high school to college within five
  • Increase baccalaureate, associate, certificate, and credential attainment by 15% across the two counties within five years.
  • Increase the six-year graduation rate by 10% over five years.
  • Improve career preparedness through strengthened partnership with industry to better align education with workforce development needs.

Innovation Award Funding provides $150,000 over two years, while encouraging the contribution of local resources through a 50% matching requirement to promote sustainability and organizational capacity. It is the intention of the Innovation Award to advance promising efforts in the region, while also recognizing the value of garnering additional resources that can be utilized for sustainability over the longer term.

The 2017 GIA Innovation Awardees:

“The GIA Innovation Awards are part of a critical and exciting effort to help more Inland Empire students enroll and succeed in college. This year’s awards will support programs that are national models for promoting college attainment and success, and UCR is proud to be an active partner in this effort.” – Chancellor Kim Wilcox, University of California-Riverside

The GIA Governing Board is comprised of top education and business leaders including San Bernardino County Superintendent Ted Alejandre, Riverside Community College District Chancellor Michael Burke, Inland Empire Economic Partnership President/CEO Paul Granillo, Cal State San Bernardino President Tomás Morales, Chaffey College Superintendent/President Henry Shannon, OneFuture Coachella Valley President/CEO Sheila Thornton, UC Riverside Chancellor Kim Wilcox, and Riverside County Superintendent Judy White.

More information about the GIA Innovation Awardees can be found on our website.

Should you have questions about the selection process, you may contact

Ann Marie Allen, Senior Director, info@inlandempiregia.org, (909) 256-0011.

Facebook: /GIATogether                             www.inlandempiregia.org.                     Twitter @GIA_Together

Growing Inland Achievement D.C. Trip

 

GIA had a chance to sit down with to discuss regional issues in Washington, D.C.

GIA spoke with about the future of the 31st District

Why we must help Inland Empire students escape poverty

College Futures Foundation Convening: “Toward A Shared Vision: Increasing Bachelor Degree Completion in the Inland Empire”, June 19-20 at the Mission Inn Hotel & Spa. #GIATogether

http://www.dailybulletin.com/opinion/20170623/why-we-must-help-inland-empire-students-escape-poverty-cheryl-brown

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